Warm Up, Chill Down, Thaw Out at
dm | contemporary

Opening Reception: Thursday, January 19th, 6 – 8 pm
Exhibition runs January 19 – February 25, 2017

A Group Exhibition With: Macyn Bolt, Richard Bottwin and Matthew Langley
I hope you can join me in “NoMad” (“NOrth of MADison Square Park”) at
dm | contemporary for an exciting exhibition with the sculpture of Richard Botwin, and the paintings of Macyn Bolt and Matthew Langley. On exhibit will be a special presentation of a large grid of 28 of my small paintings. I’m thrilled to be able to exhibit these since the overwhelming response I received at CONTEXT: Art Miami in December.

I’d be love to see you on Thursday the 19th, please RSVP to info@dmcontemporary.com

DM | Contemporary
39 East 29th Street 2nd Floor
New York, NY 10016

Exhibition: 2016 Year In Review at Susan Calloway Fine Arts

Opening Reception: January 13, 6 – 8pm
Exhibition runs January 13 – February 4

Susan Calloway Fine Arts is celebrating the nine exhibitions spanning abstract to landscape from 2016, She is hosting an exhibition highlighting the dynamic artworks that were on view. Come see select works by Dana Westring, Mark Willems, Mark Giaimo, Carol Reed, Dean Fisher, Katie Pumphrey, Natasha Karpinskaia, Maud Taber-Thomas, Steven S. Walker, Antonia Walker, and Matthew Langley.

Susan Calloway Fine Arts
1643 Wisconsin Ave NW
Washington, DC 20007

My Work at CONTEXT: Art Miami

I’ll have work at CONTEXT: Art Miami in the Art in Public Spaces Program. I’ll be exhibiting 35 of my small artworks in a stand alone exhibition. You will be able to find my work at space SP10. This will be my largest presentation of these works ever (35 paintings) attached is one of the proposal images for the installation.

Thanks to F. Lennox Campello and the team at Alida Anderson Art Projects for sponsoring this exhibition.

For more information:
CONTEXT ART MIAMI
Midtown | Wynwood Arts District
118 NE 34th Street
Miami, FL 33127

Web site:
CONTEXT: Art Miami

A Great New Film Service

FilmStruck is a new streaming service that will also host nearly the entire Criterion Collection on its platform. If that doesn’t make you want to rethink you Netflix subscription I don’t know what will.

TCM and the Criterion Collection have launched FilmStruck, that will feature a library of contemporary and classic arthouse, indie, foreign, and cult films, as well as extensive bonus content, filmmaker interviews, and rare footage. For example, over the weekend I watched Truffaut’s The Last Metro, Robert Altman’s The Player, and Jim Jarmusch’s Stranger Than Paradise. FilmStruck hosts nearly the entire Criterion Collection for as little as Ten dollars a month.

As I started to look at the collection of films offered I realized that none of these films will ever shown up on Netflix – at least not anytime soon.

Learn more about Filmstruck at Filmstruck.com

Listening to Paint Dry – Episode 3

Episode Three: Features music from the Cure, Broadcast, Nine Inch Nails, Squarepusher, Red House Painters, Angelo Baldimenti, John Coltrane, and Lloyd Cole

Listening to Paint Dry is a podcast for environments that are looking for something to listen to that won’t get in the way of your thinking. The music you will hear on LTPD is as ignorable as it is interesting, and as interesting as it is ignorable.

Listening to Paint Dry is a music podcast by Matthew Langley.

Recently Published: A Year in Painting

Purchase A Year in Painting by following this link.

The first monograph by myself. A Year in Painting chronicles the Painting A Day project that I undertook that would jump-start my artistic creativity, encourage personal experimentation and eventually change my artwork in ways that were unexpected.

This monograph, traces the project that began life in late 2014 that would eventually become a project to create a painting every day of the year for 2015. The artworks are presented in chronological order allowing the reader to go on the same journey that the artist experienced.

A Year in Painting contains over 370 full color images with a introduction by Chris Martin.

David Salle: How To See

“In my view, intentionality is not just overrated; it puts the cart so far out in front that the horse, sensing futility, gives up and lies down in the street. Nobody ever loved a painting for its ideas.”

David Salle has a new book out about painting.

Frankly I’m not going to go out and buy it. Right now, it’s not a good fit for me, that does not mean that I’m not interested in some of the things he has to say. The above quote is front and center.

Recently I’ve had a couple of friends go to graduate school – decent schools as well and both have had the same story. Both programs so valued the artist statement (written in the first month of the program) that it was used as an actual roadmap of what the artist would be able to do (or not able to do as the case may be). I for one was a little bit surprised by this because I’ve always thought that time in the studio was meant for exploring and idea generation as well as making finished work.

Needless to say all formal critiques in both programs started with the artist statement and it was used as a literal guide to what was discussed and what was not. Or should I say what was allowed to be discussed.

Although both were lucky they were able to paint at all in their programs, as both were told that painting was still dead and evidently has been since the early 1970’s.

David Salles new book is called How To See and is available from places that sell books.